Bitmoji Profile Pictures (and some educational ideas too)

So I’ve had a couple of requests for directions on making Bitmoji icons for Office 365 email.  To make this a little more “educational” I am going to add that once you learn how to do it, you could considering making Bitmoji stickers for your classroom.  I’ll add a link for directions on how to do that at the bottom.

To Create a Bitmoji Profile Picture for Office 365:

Set Up Your Bitmoji on Your Phone

  • Download the Bitmoji app to your phone (if you don’t already have it).  Create your account.
  • Customize your Avatar on your phone.

Install the Bitmoji Chrome App on Your Computer

  • Open Up Chrome and install the Bitmoji Chrome App.
  • Login to the Bitmoji Chrome App with the same login as your phone.

Save a Bitmoji to Your Computer

  • Click on the Bitmoji Extension and find the Bitmoji you want to use.

extension

  • Right click on the Bitmoji and choose Save image as….  Save it to a place wehre you can find it again (maybe your desktop).

save as

Change Your Profile Picture in Office 365

  • Now login to Office 365 Mail.
  • Click on your profile picture (it may just be your initials) in the top right corner.

office

  • Click on the picutre icon.

pic

  • Choose Upload a new photo

upload

  • Adjust the photo as needed and then click Apply.

apply

Using Bitmoji in the Classroom

After you’ve customized your email, you may want to consider using Bitmoji in the classroom!  Check out this great blog post about how to make Bitmoji stickers!

https://mymathscape.wordpress.com/2017/01/02/why-and-how-i-bitmoji-in-my-classroom/

mymathscape.wordpress.com
Why I Bitmoji? If I’m being completely honest, I bitmoji because I am obsessed and I find joy in sending and receiving bitmoji. And all the cool kids are doing it!

 

Laptop Collection Directions

Backing Up Files in One Drive

Backing up Files in One Drive Handout

Backing Up Book Marks

Below are directions for exporting bookmarks in Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, and Internet Explorer.  You can export the bookmarks and save them in OneDrive, then after you get your new laptop you can follow directions to import bookmarks.

 Google Chrome:

https://support.google.com/chrome/answer/96816?hl=en

Mozilla Firefox:

https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/export-firefox-bookmarks-to-backup-or-transfer?cache=no

 Internet Explorer:

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/211089/how-to-import-and-export-the-internet-explorer-favorites-folder-to-a-32-bit-version-of-windows

Roanoke Mini Maker Faire

The very first Roanoke Mini Maker Faire is coming to the Science Museum of Western Virginia on April 22 from 1:00pm – 5:00pm, and I am beyond excited.

What is a Maker Faire? 

MF_RobotA Maker Faire is a gathering of fascinating, curious people who enjoy learning and who love sharing what they can do. From engineers to artists to scientists to crafters, Maker Faire is a venue for these “makers” to show hobbies, experiments, projects. We call it the Greatest Show (& Tell) on Earth – a family-friendly showcase of invention, creativity, and resourcefulness.  There are many Maker Faires across the world, and it’s so cool that Roanoke will have it’s very own AND that our students will be able to attend and participate in this global movement!

What will you see and do at the Roanoke Mini Maker Faire?IMG_8095

Students from all over the New River and Roanoke Valleys will be showing off their Maker skills – from lip balm to an interactive ocean exhibit to a dancing troupe of robots and much more.  Other Makers will be there too, including the Roanoke Robotics & Makers Club with their retro arcade games and robots.  There will be a chance to make Milkweed Missiles with kids from Green Valley Elementary and talk to the Wind Turbinators from Valley Elementary, and all sorts of other opportunities for kids (and kids at hear) to build and make.  All ages are welcome to attend, and it’s FREE!

Big Thanks!

Karen Richardson from The Virginia Society of Technology in Education and Hannah Weiss from the Science Museum of Western Virginia have been instrumental in getting this event to happen in our own backyard, and I am so grateful for their expertise and hard work.  Checkout the website for the event, reserve your free tickets, and check out the list of Makers that will be there.

We hope you will bring the whole family and stop by to glimpse the future and get inspired at the Greatest Show and Tell (on Earth)!

MakerFaire_GreatestShowAndTell_A

 

 

 

Green Screen Resources

Using Green Screen by Doink App

Directions for using Green Screen by Doink app

Tutorials from Do Ink

Places to get free picture/videos

Other Resources

Check out this Flyer for Tons of other resources, ideas, and examples
Green Screen Magic by Janet Corder and Joan Gore

CuePrompter is a free online teleprompter. Write or cut and paste your script in the teleprompter window. You can change the font size, colors and prompter window.

Small Group Center Ideas

Our division has really been talking hard about small groups.  Our literacy plan requires small groups in Language Arts, but teachers are also asked to come up with ideas for Math, Science and Social Studies — even cross-circular activities.  Here are some ideas for using Technology in small groups.

 Minecraft Edu (Use Prompts to match your content – area, perimeter, models of science or social studies concepts, novel settings, etc.)  — All Roanoke County teachers and students have accounts.

Breakout Edu (Digital Breakouts)https://platform.breakoutedu.com/ ; Create a free teacher account to find the free games; Example: Finding Frosty – https://platform.breakoutedu.com/game/FINDING-FROSTY

Formative (Game Based) Assessment Websites

 Reflection

Coding

 Organizing

 Creating

Are there any other ideas or resources that you use in your classroom?

VSTE Ignite Session (SDGS)

Here is my ignigte speech on Sustainable Development Goals.  It was the first time I’d ever done an Ignite presentation (20 slides, 15 seconds per slide, 5 minutes total).  We were supposed to pick something we were passionate about, so I picked Sustainable Development Goals.  I hadn’t known about them before last year, and I thought there might be other people like me who hadn’t heard of them either.  I thought it might be a good way to at least introduce them to some educators.

I did misquote a couple of statistics–I was a little nervous!  Here’s are a few excerpts with the correct statistics and some links to more information.


On 25 September 2015, the 193 countries of the UN General Assembly adopted the 2030 Development Agenda titled “Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development” otherwise known as the SDGs – Sustainable Development Goals. There are 17 of these goals that have specific targets to be achieved over the next 15 years (by 2030).

150902B_TheGlobalGoals_Logo_and_Icons_Newversion_edited_11.09.15ai-2

The goals that came before the SDGS are called the MDGs (Millennium Development Goals. These goals were also created by world leaders at the United Nations Headquarters. They committed their nations to a new global partnership to reduce extreme poverty – with a deadline of 2015 – that have become known as the Millennium Development Goals.

The first goal, eradicate extreme poverty and hunger, was to halve the proportion of people living in poverty by 2015. The MDGS use a 1990 statistic as their baseline that said that 36% of people in the world live in extreme poverty. Their goal was to reduce that proportion to 18%.

Did that happen? No.

Actually, by 2015, the proportion of people living in abject poverty was reduced to 12%, so we exceeded that goal! Progress was made in other areas too!

  • Enrollment in primary education in developing regions has reached 91% (up from 83%).
  • The mortality rate of children under five has been cut by more than half since 1990.
  • Between 2000 and 2013 new HIV infections fell by 40% and 37 million tuberculosis deaths have been averted.
  • 2.6 Billion People have gained access to improved drinking water since 1990.

We still have a long way to go, but it actually may be possible, if we all work together, to end poverty for good! The world CAN get better!

After learning about what the SDGs were, I began researching how to help. I wanted to know how can citizens and teachers and principals and ITRTS and tech leaders and STUDENTS help with these lofty Goals? I think there’s three main ways.

First, check out the SDGs and learn more!
There are tons of resources out there, from apps, to websites, even online courses.

Second, incorporate the SDGs into your classroom – find lessons or projects to join!
Not only are their resources for you to learn more, but there are resources already available for you to use with your students. We talk about 5 C’s and PBLS, and global goals are the perfect way to be able to incorporate those concepts.

Share the global goals with your students, find a lesson, and empower them to make a difference in their world! And if you are in a position where you work with teachers, help them find these resources and support them as they use them! There are all sorts of projects that students can join, or you can make your own!

Third, it’s been said that Knowledge is Power. Spread the word! Be an advocate!
As educational technology leaders, we hopefully have the ability and platform to spread the word! Participate in Global Ed Twitter chats, use the hashtag #teachSDGS and #GlobalEd really use the power of social media to get the word out!